Animal Love / L’amour des animaux

International conference /Colloque international

20-23 March 2019

Hôtel d’Assézat, Toulouse 

Call for Papers

 

From companion species to the love of animals for members of their own species or of other species, the phrase “animal love” is polysemous. We first think about the love dogs and cats have for their human companions and about the reciprocal relationship of attachment of human beings for those nonhuman companions accompanying parts of their lives; we can think about the dog following his human companion’s coffin and accompanying him/her to the grave, staying there days and nights and sometimes dying there.  What can we say of the American cat who, in a hospital, goes into dying people’s rooms, knowing before doctors that those people are going to die and accompanying them until their last breath? How can we define her gratuitous, strange role as a companion, allowing them to pass away while offering them a friendly, reassuring presence?  

Animal love is both the human being’s love for an animal or several animals and the love—or any feeling we could associate with love—of the animal for the human being and the love of animals for one another. Can we consider the gesture of a hippopotamus for the antelope that he tries to rescue from the crocodile’s teeth, staying with her head in its mouth until her last breath, as love? What about the behaviour of a group of street cats in Argentina, who saved a lost human infant by giving him food and lying on him so that he did not die of cold in the night, until the day when he was found. Is this love? Is it some survival instinct shared with those who are threatened? Is it some unexplainable empathy? How can we define the notion of animal love? Could those gestures of apparent tenderness, compassion or empathy of the animal world be qualified as love—could they be linked with love or are they instinctive rescuing gestures made by whatever species to prolong the animal presence on the Earth?

Animal love takes many forms. The papers proposed for this conference could concern the following:

– human beings’ love for animals.

– animals’ love for humans and animals sacrificing their lives to save their human companions.

– inter-species feelings; can we speak about feelings or survival instinct? Is love first some survival instinct, an instinct of preservation of the species? Or is it the relationship uniting two creatures, one human, the other one nonhuman? Is it a totally gratuitous link with no practical motivation, just echoing Montaigne’s sentence about his friendship with La Boétie: “because it was he, because it was I.”

– The scientific love of animals as a research topic can be evoked; the passion of scientists for a particular species they want to understand: ornithologists, beekeepers, entomologists, zoologists.

– Animal love can also be a life project, for veterinarians who heal and save our companions.

– Animal protection in cities can also be tackled, opposing for example those who try to protect pigeons that they love like all the other birds, and those who poison them as they consider them as polluting elements and not as living creatures; yet pigeons saved thousands of lives while carrying messages in wartime and now they are doomed in many cities as most of their dovecotes, which would be the solution to protect both pigeons and cities, have been destroyed. In some cases dovecotes are restored. We can also think about Aldo Leopold’s evocation of the extermination of the passenger pigeon in the USA and about Nathanael Johnson’s book Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness.

– Papers could evoke the link uniting homeless people and animals: is it a reunion of solitudes or can we speak about reconstruction and resilience through reciprocal love? (James Bowen’s book A Street Cat Named Bob, telling about a reciprocal rescuing of the street musician.

– We can also think about animal love in wartime and the way animal love allays the suffering due to war, as well as the way animal love can be opposed to men’s cruelty (Timothy Findley’s evocation of Robert Ross’s love for animals in The Wars, or about the ornithologist Jacques Delamain listening to the song of an oriole on September 10th, 1918).

– Animals are also very present in travel literature: animals met during the journey or animals allowing the journey (horses, mules, donkeys, camels, dromedaries, yaks, huskies, etc…). Is the relationship between the traveller and the animal as a vehicle a practical one or is there an affective link? The core of the subject concerns communication between species: does love make communication between species easier?

-The multiple animals appearing in N. Scott Momaday’s work can lead us to wonder whether those animals speak about love or about a sense of connection? And is animal love the most obvious way of evoking the sense of connection that is still present with animals and some peoples all over the world, but which the modern man has broken? Is the gesture of hunters giving up their guns after seeing a dying animal’s eye, love or awareness? (N. Scott Momaday). Is awareness a form of love?

Another question may be asked: is taming an act of love, responsibility or domination, (see Saint-Exupéry and the fox in Le Petit prince.) We can refer to Donna Haraway. In The Companion Species Manifesto, Haraway, deals with the relationships of co-dependence and co-creation between men and their “companion species.”She speaks about a  process of dynamic co-evolution that tends towards the blurring of  separations between species, and more particularly between men and dogs.

The aim of this conference is  to consider animal love in its multipicity,  from a philosophical, scientific and literary angle at the same time, by inscribing the theme in the wider relationship of man with the world and in  the environmental and ecocritical vision as well.

Françoise Besson, Académie des Sciences, Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de

Toulouse, Université de Toulouse-Jean Jaurès                          

Nathalie Dessens, Université de Toulouse-Jean Jaurès

Marcel Delpoux, Académie des Sciences, Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de Toulouse

Scott Slovic, University of Idaho

Please send proposals to:

 

Françoise Besson, francoise.besson@wanadoo.fr, francoise.besson@univ-tlse2.fr,

Marcel Delpoux, mdelpoux@gmail.com

Scott Slovic, slovic@uidaho.edu,  before September 1st, 2018.

 

International conference /Colloque international

20-23 March 2019

Hôtel d’Assézat, Toulouse  

Appel à communication

 

Des espèces compagnes à la relation (l’amour ?) des animaux pour des membres de leur propre espèce ou d’espèces différentes,  l’expression “l’amour des animaux” est polysémique. On pense à l’amour des chiens et chats pour leur compagnon humain et à la relation réciproque de l’attachement humain pour ces êtres non-humains qui accompagnent leur vie, au chien qui accompagne son ami humain jusqu’à la tombe et va y rester des jours et parfois se laissera mourir. Que dire de ce chat américain qui dans un hôpital, va dans les chambres de malades dont il perçoit avant les médecins qu’ils vont mourir bientôt et les accompagne jusqu’à leur dernier souffle ? Comment définir son rôle gratuit et étrange d’accompagnateur qui va leur permettre le passage en leur offrant une présence amie et rassurante ?

L’amour des animaux, c’est à la fois l’amour de l’être humain pour  le monde animal, l’amour — ou tout autre sentiment auquel il conviendra de réfléchir — de l’animal pour l’être humain et l’amour des animaux entre eux ; l’amour pour tout souffle de vie ; l’amour de la chatte pour ses petits, le geste de l’hippopotame tentant de sauver l’antilope de la gueule du crocodile, les soins d’une bande de chats des rues en Argentine sauvant un enfant perdu en lui apportant de la nourriture et en le réchauffant jusqu’à ce qu’il soit retrouvé. Est-ce de l’amour ? Est-ce un instinct de survie ? Une empathie inexplicable ? Comment définir la notion d’amour des animaux ? Ces gestes de tendresse, de compassion ou d’empathie du monde animal peuvent-ils être rattachés à l’amour ou sont-ils des gestes instinctifs de sauvetage de quelque espèce que ce soit visant à prolonger la présence animale sur la terre ?

L’amour des animaux peut se décliner de multiples manières:

– l’amour de l’homme pour les animaux ;

– l’amour des animaux pour l’homme et les animaux qui se sacrifient pour sauver leur compagnon humain ;

– l’amour des animaux entre eux ;

– les sentiments inter-espèces ; peut-on parler de sentiments, d’instinct de survie, et l’amour est-il d’abord instinct de survie et de préservation de l’espèce ou la relation qui unit deux êtres, l’un humain, l’autre non-humain, est-il un lien totalement gratuit qui n’a aucune motivation utilitaire, mais rappelle juste la phrase de Montaigne sur son amitié avec La Boétie : “parce que c’était lui, parce que c’était moi” ?

– l’amour scientifique des animaux comme sujet de recherche ; la passion des scientifiques pour une espèce particulière : ornithologues, apiculteurs, entomologistes, zoologistes.

– l’amour des animaux comme projet de vie pour les vétérinaires qui sauvent.

– la protection animale dans les villes opposant par exemple ceux qui tentent de protéger les  pigeons qu’ils aiment comme les autres oiseaux,  et ceux qui les empoisonnent car ils les voient comme des objets de pollution et non comme des êtres vivants ; pourtant les pigeons ont sauvé des milliers de vie en transportant des messages en temps de guerre et ils sont maintenant condamnés dans de nombreuses villes car la plupart des pigeonniers, qui constitueraient une solution pour protéger à la fois les pigeons et les villes,  ont été détruits. Dans certains cas, ils sont réhabilités pour le bonheur des conservateurs de patrimoines, des pigeons et de tous les voisins humains. On peut penser aussi à l’évocation par Aldo Leopold de l’extermination des pigeons ramiers aux Etats-Unis. Et aussi à l’ouvrage de Nathanael Johnson, Unseen City. The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness.

-Parmi les exemples d’amour des animaux, on peut penser aux sans abris et sans domiciles fixes, et à leur relation aux animaux qui les accompagnent: réunion de deux solitudes ou reconstruction et résilience à travers l’amour réciproque ? On pense à James Bowen et à son livre A Street Cat Named Bob, racontant le sauvetage réciproque  du musicien des rues par le chat blessé et abandonné et du chat par le musicien des rues.

– On pense aussi à l’amour des animaux face à la guerre (Timothey Findley opposant l’amour de son personnage pour les animaux à la cruauté humaine de la guerre dans The Wars, ou l’ornithologue Jacques Delamain écoutant le chant du loriot le 10 septembre 1918).

-Les animaux sont aussi très présents  dans la littérature de voyage : animaux rencontrés et animaux permettant le voyage (chevaux, ânes, mulets, dromadaires et chameaux, yacks, chiens de traineaux, etc…). Est-ce seulement une relation utilitaire ou un lien affectif se tisse-t-il entre le voyageur et l’animal “véhicule” ?

 -Avec les multiples animaux apparaissant dans l’œuvre de N. Scott Momaday, peut-on parler d’amour ou de sens de la connexion? Et l’amour des animaux est-il la manière la plus évidente d’évoquer le sens de la connexion  qui est encore présent chez les animaux et chez certains peuples, mais que l’homme moderne a brisé?  Est-ce que le geste des chasseurs  qui posent définitivement leur fusil après avoir vu  l’ombre de la mort dans l’œil d’un animal abattu, est de l’amour ou une prise de conscience ? (N. Scott Momaday) La conscience est-elle une forme d’amour ? 

Une autre question peut se poser : l’acte d’apprivoiser est-il un acte d’amour, de responsabilité ou de domination (voir Saint-Exupéry et le renard dans Le Petit prince). On pourra se référer aux ouvrages de Donna Haraway. Par exemple, dans The Companion Species Manifesto, Haraway, s’intéresse aux relations de co-dépendance et de co-création entre les hommes et leurs “espèces compagnes”, et parle d’un processus de co-évolution dynamique qui tend à gommer les séparations entre les espèces, et plus particulièrement entre les hommes et les chiens.

Le but de ce colloque est d’envisager l’amour des animaux, l’amour animal, l’amour pour les animaux dans sa multiplicité et sous un angle à la fois philosophique, scientifique, littéraire et artistique et en inscrivant ce thème dans la relation plus large de l’homme au monde et dans la vision environnementale et écocritique.

Françoise Besson, Académie des Sciences, Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de                                 

Toulouse, Université de Toulouse-Jean Jaurès

Nathalie Dessens, Université de Toulouse-Jean Jaurès

Marcel Delpoux, Académie des Sciences, Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de Toulouse

Scott Slovic, University of Idaho

Les propositions sont à envoyer à :

 

Françoise Besson, francoise.besson@wanadoo.fr, francoise.besson@univ-tlse2.fr,

Marcel Delpoux, mdelpoux@gmail.com

Scott Slovic, slovic@uidaho.edu, avant le 1er septembre 2018.

 

 


Leave a Reply

O seu endereço de e-mail não será publicado. Campos obrigatórios são marcados com *